view from ground of front of Linderhof Palace
Castles,  Germany,  Travel

Schloss Linderhof – Plan Your Visit

As a child, King Ludwig II had visited Königshäuschen, his King father’s hunting lodge tucked away in the Bavarian Alps. Five years into his reign, in 1869, King Ludwig began expansion into what he called Schloss Linderhof. The Linder family tended to the farm (in German “hof“) housed on this land centuries before. It was to be the smallest of his palaces – and the only one of which he lived to see completed.

Schloss Linderhof is just 45 km from Schloss Hohenschwangau, King Ludwig’s childhood home, and Schloss Neuschwanstein, his fairytale castle. I would highly recommend planning a visit to these while you’re in the area.

view from ground of front of Linderhof Palace
About the Castle

Schloss Linderhof has only 10 rooms, 4 of which were to house servants. Built for one person, it truly was King Ludwig’s retreat from the hustle and bustle of royal life.

The palace offers guided tours in German and in English. Tours last about 25 minutes. No self-guided tours are available. The tour schedule alternates languages so be sure to pay attention this when choosing a time.

Please note: The Venus Grotto is currently closed for restoration until the end of 2024.

Reservations
  • Reservations must be made at least 7 days in advance but can be done as far out as 6 months
About the Tour
  • From October 16 to April 14, all park buildings, except the Royal Lodge, are closed
  • This is the only palace in which you may bring a dog, however, they must be carried
  • The palace permits dogs on the grounds on a leash
  • The palace does not allow bulky strollers or large hiking backpacks in the castle – there are lockers available on-site to store larger items
  • You may not take photos inside the castle
Accessibility
  • There are wheelchairs and walkers available upon request
  • The palace has a motorized stair lift available upon request
  • The Grotto, Hunding’s Hut, and Royal Lodge are wheelchair accessible; you can also see into the Hermitage of Gurnemanz
  • The Moroccan House and Moorish Kiosk are stairs-only access
Opening Hours:

April to October 15: 9:00 am – 6:00 pm (tickets sold from 8:30 am – 5:30 pm)

October 16 to March: 9:00 am – 4:30 pm (tickets sold from 9:30 am – 4:00 pm

Closed Christmas Eve/Day, New Year’s Eve/Day, and Shrove Tuesday

Cost:
Palace and Park Buildings

€8.50 general admission

€7.50 for students with valid ID and those over 65

Park Buildings Only

€5 general admission

€4 for students with valid ID and those over 65

Royal Lodge Only

€2 general admission

€1 for students with valid ID and those over 65

Children under 18 are free – but they still need a ticket

See below for information on combination tickets

Additional Information

In addition to the palace, visitors are able to enjoy the grounds and the Venus Grotto, as well as the Royal Buildings – the Moorish Kiosk, the Moroccan House, Hunding’s Hut, Gurnemanz Hermitage, and the Royal Lodge.

Combination Tickets
Königsticket (“Kings Ticket”)
Neuschwanstein and Hohenschwangau (Visit both on the same day)

€25 general admission

€23 for students with valid ID and those over 65

Königsschlösser (“King’s Palaces”)
Neuschwanstein, Linderhof, and Herrenchiemsee (One visit to each within a 6 month period)

€26 per person

Bavarian Palace Administration Options
Visit over forty sites across Bavaria (includes Linderhof, Herrenchiemsee, and Neuschwanstein – does NOT include Hohenschwangau as it is privately managed)
Annual Season Tickets

€45 per person

€75 for a family or two people

14-day Tickets

€30 per person

€65 for a family or two people

What do you think?